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Internet and Email Safety

Phishing Attempts

What is a phishing attempt?

You receive an email with a link - from people you know and trust - however the email is a spoof and the link isn't real either - by clicking on it you can unleash downloadable viruses, input sensitive data (i.e. passwords) and let someone into your account. It is possible for the same message to be forwarded to your contact list.

What to do?
If you receive a phishing email or if someone you know receives an email with unknown links (from you), immediately change your password.

Bloomfield Hills Schools will never ask you to provide sensitive information via email. If you are ever unsure of something you have received from us, please do not hesitate to connect with us to verify the authenticity of the email. In instances of mass communication, we will often duplicate the message on our website. This is a good way to verify the email or notice is authentic.

With these addresses they can

Phishing Attacks & Avoidance Information:

FTC | Phishing | Consumer Information

FTC | Roundtable Discussion on Phishing Education

  • http://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/reports/roundtable-discussion-phishing-education-staff-report-federal-trade-commission%E2%80%99s-division-consumer/080714phishingroundtable.pdf

Google | About phishing

Google | Avoid and report Google scams



Brute Force/Password Cracking

Password cracking is the direct attack of computers on your password. Weak passwords take seconds to minutes to break, strong passwords can take months or even years with this method.

A strong password consists of at least six characters (and the more characters, the stronger the password) that are a combination of letters, numbers and symbols (@, #, $, %, etc.) if allowed. Passwords are typically case-sensitive, so a strong password contains letters in both uppercase and lowercase. A strong password consists of at least six characters (and the more characters, the stronger the password) that are a combination of letters, numbers and symbols (@, #, $, %, etc.) if allowed. Passwords are typically case-sensitive, so a strong password contains letters in both uppercase and lowercase.

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